Archive for October, 2011

Giulia rien à mettre – eco fashion glamour

Sustainable Fashion is often scarcely considered because too hippy looking or simply not fashionable enough.

Giulia rien à mettre collections are once for all stating how glamour and sustainability can coincide.

Giulia Mazzer, starting from her architectural background, demonstrates how materials attentive to the environment and the people, together with transparency and traceability, can merge in creating a collection that goes beyond fashion. Simple lines and sharp colour block combinations define Giulia rien à mettre sring/summer 2012 mood.

The result is a pleasant flow of colours and shapes for a young yet elegant women, attentive to fashion and sustainability.

The use of non-violent silk for an evening gown goes far beyond the pure style exercise and becomes a beautiful and glamorous dress.

Campeche: Natural dyes in industry – Back to the roots (from shirahime.com)

Ethicalista has been a guest blogger for Shirahime.

We really enjoyed talking about our discoveries after visiting Campeche’s “backstage”.
Here is the post:

CampecheLooking at Ethical Fashion and Sustainable Practices in the Textile World, dyes are definitely one of the most controversial and problematic fields. Everyone knows about vegetable dyes and their use through history till the late 19th century. They are indeed a possible choice for designers and brands to reduce the ecological footprint of their products.
The clichés make us believe however, that vegetable dyes are associated with the image of small-scale production, or even only home-made products, using with large pots and wooden spoons. Fortunately we had the chance to meet someone who is trying to bring the reality and history of vegetable dyes into industrial production.

Thanks to their family tradition and a strong push towards sustainability, Marco and Andrea Clerici created Campeche, a brand of accessories all realized exclusively with natural textiles and vegetable colours, in the facilities of their own industrial mainstream dye plant…

continue reading on Shirahime

Milk Fiber: eco or not? 2.0

In Milk Fiber: eco or not? of the 24 March 2011, Ethicalista has already been addressing the sustainability concerns of Milk Fiber.

During this last summer many blogs, magazines and journalists have been talking extensively about the German fashion designer Anke Domaske who realized the latest collection of her Mademoiselle Chi Chi entirely with an apparently innovative Milk Fiber created by her and her team called QMilch.

This is part of a today Reuters article where she clearly states that Qmilch is completely natural and ecofriendly.

Milk fabric has been around since the 1930s but was always produced in unecological ways that used a lot of chemicals. Unlike earlier prototypes, QMilch is made almost entirely from casein.

“We have developed an all-natural fiber consisting of a very high concentration of casein, with a few other natural ingredients — and in only two years,” the former microbiology student Domaske said.

The casein is extracted from dried milk powder and then heated up in a type of meat-mincing machine with other natural ingredients. The fiber comes out in strands and is then spun into yarn on a spinning machine.

Domaske said it would take about 6 liters of milk to produce an entire dress, which costs about 150 euros($199) to 200 euros.

Luckily, for that kind of money, the clothes don’t come with an expiry date — during the heating process, the molecules bind in such a way that the protein won’t decompose.

Due to its anti-bacterial qualities, the milk fiber can also be used in medicine and makeup. Even some auto companies have looked into using the fiber for car upholstery.

(Reporting By Natalia Drozdiak, editing by Paul Casciato, for REUTERS )

Here after Anke Domaske interview at Deutsche Welle

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